Mobile app solutions to engage with your patients and partners: Automate your processes and build a fan base with software apps.

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I was speaking with some of my LinkedIn associates ( mostly doctors)  about an article in the New York Times. I have been quoted in the New York Times before, and am aware that they can sensationalize things a bit and offer a point of view that fits their agenda. The main complaint in the article was that doctors and nurses are taken advantage of by hospital administrators who squeeze additional time demands on their staff. Patient appointments are limited to 15 minutes when they should really allow 45 minutes, doctors are tasked with charting using EMR formats that require hours of data entry.

In realizing this, I started to think about how automation may be able to free up time, and make life a bit easier for these struggling professionals. The app development process involves a hyper-creative mindset for certain. The FDA has started to regulate such mobile applications, beginning in 2013 when it realized that many apps behave like medical devices. Intent of use and how the app is built, regardless of terms of use statements, must be evaluated. There are some fairly large hurdles to overcome, for example, if a patient is self managing a disease using such an app to do so. Barring physician substituted functions, and HIPAA compliance issues, there is a huge opportunity to automate much of what doctors and biotech professionals do. For example, an audio dictation program could be used to chart patients. Using a voice recognition interface, and a HIPAA compliant encrypted system, a doctor could dictate the chart information as the patient is with him or her in the exam room, and send the encrypted data to a secure EMR platform. An app could be invoked to allow patients to track heart rate data, hormone levels or insulin spikes someday and send the data to a platform that could evaluate it for their personalized situation. Much of this technology is in development already, and just requires more sophistication to get something that works really well. Video teleconferences with physicians and patients on a secure channel is another way to make after hours emergency care possible and time efficient. The possibilities are endless.

Biotech firms can also use mobile apps to get potential partners and investors interested in their technology. A fan base can be established by leveraging apps that have functions similar to their tech. News updates that are related to the new biotechnology could be built in to the application. Sometimes the app itself is the technology.

Monitoring apps that send data to doctors in real time are the holy grail for immediate care systems. CRM software integration can generate automated responses based on personal scenarios. These integrations can also inform and update. Video and animations dashboards to illustrate concepts and educate patients and partners can also be integrated within an app.

I was speaking with some of my LinkedIn associates ( mostly doctors)  about an article in the New York Times. I have been quoted in the New York Times before, and am aware that they can sensationalize things a bit and offer a point of view that fits their agenda. The main complaint in the article was that doctors and nurses are taken advantage of by hospital administrators who squeeze additional time demands on their staff. Patient appointments are limited to 15 minutes when they should really allow 45 minutes, doctors are tasked with charting using EMR formats that require hours of data entry.

Struggles with chronic conditions and an aging population continue to make the lives of physicians, nurses and researchers challenging. Regenerative and personalized medicine offers much hope as repair strategies loom on the horizon. The genomics revolution is almost upon us, which will require exponential medical data management. Until these new technologies emerge, chronic conditions management is an ever increasing responsibility that weighs heavily on healthcare professionals. Automated solutions may be the best way to bridge the gap in developing and managing patient care in the interim.

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